Posts Tagged ‘cervical cancer’

What Do You Know About Cervical Health?

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer in the U.S. HPV is very common and is spread through sexual activity, which is why it is recommended that pre-teens received the HPV vaccine.

According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, roughly 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the U.S. each year. A pap test can detect potentially dangerous changes in cervical cells that might indicate cancer. Since certain genotypes of HPV are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancers, testing for these particular variations can help your physician better assess your risk and determine the right screening schedule for you.

According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, symptoms can include any of the following:

  • Abnormal bleeding, such as bleeding between regular menstrual periods, after intercourse, or after menopause
  • Pelvic pain not related to your menstrual cycle
  • Heavy or unusual discharge that may be watery, thick, and possibly have a foul odor
  • Increased urinary frequency
  • Pain during urination

The good news is that cervical cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, so make sure you talk to your doctor about getting the screening you need to identify or prevent this disease.

For more information on cervical health, visit the National Cervical Cancer Coalition’s website.

 

January is Cervical Health Month

Close up profile of mother and daughter looking at each other

According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women. Fortunately, it is also slow growing and therefore easily preventable. Cervical cancer tends to strike women in middle age, but routine screenings called Pap tests can aid in early detection and treatment. Depending on your age and family history, your doctor can suggest a screening schedule that is right for you. Cervical cancer doesn’t always cause symptoms early on, so it’s important to get your recommended screenings.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists HPV (human papillomavirus) as the primary cause of all cervical cancers. An HPV vaccine is available to preteens/teens/young adults and is recommended for protection from the viruses that are responsible for most cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers.

For more information on cervical cancer, visit the National Cervical Cancer Coalition’s or Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s websites.

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

Happy Senior African Woman

Cervical cancer can often be detected early through regular pap screenings. The American Cancer Society recommends women between the ages of 21 and 29 have an annual Pap test. After age 30, they recommend a Pap and HPV screening every 5 years, or just a Pap test every three years until age 65. If you have any of the below risk factors or have had an abnormal result from a Pap test, your doctor will determine how frequently you should be screened.

According to the American Cancer Society, having an HPV (human papilloma virus) infection, especially one by a higher-risk HPV type or that does not resolve on its own, is the greatest risk factor for cervical cancer. Smoking, being overweight, a family history of the disease, long-term birth control use, and those who are immunorepressed are also at an increased risk. For a complete list of risk factors, visit the American Cancer Society’s website.

Make your preventive screenings an important part of your cancer prevention lifestyle! Visit the American Cancer Society’s website for more information.

 

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and Home Care Plus is helping spread the word that there is a lot you can do to prevent cervical cancer.

HPV (human papillomavirus) is the most common sexually transmitted disease. It is also a major cause of cervical cancer. About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, but many people with HPV don’t know they are infected. According to the National Cervical Cancer Coaltion, between 80-90% of HPV infections resolve naturally.

The good news?

  • HPV can be prevented by the HPV vaccine.
  • Cervical cancer can often be prevented with regular screening tests (called Pap tests) and follow-up care.

Visit the National Cervical Cancer Coalition’s website for more information on screening recommendations, symptoms and more.

Taking small steps can help keep you safe and healthy!

Facts and figures courtesy of Healthfinder.gov.